Fresh Pasta

After watching an episode of MasterChef Junior, my culinary confidence left the building. There was a challenge where the 9, 10, 11 & 12 year old contestants had to make their own pasta, sauce, etc. They do this without any recipes. Every single dish could have been served at an expensive restaurant. So in an effort to stop myself from hanging up my apron, I dug out my pasta machine from the basement.  Here it is – Fettuccini Pasta.

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Fresh Pasta

Serves 4 to 6

2 cups flour, plus extra for rolling the pasta
3 large eggs

Equipment
Mixing bowl
Fork or dough whisk
Pasta machine (or you can make pasta by hand)
Baking sheet
Clean dishtowel

Combine the Flour and eggs: Whisk the flour with a fork in a medium mixing bowl. Or mix in the bowl of a food processor.

Add the Eggs: Create a deep well in the middle of the flour and crack the eggs into this well. Whisk the eggs with the fork to combine. OR Pulse in a food processor until combined, then run the processor continuously until a dough is formed. Proceed with kneading and shaping the dough as directed.

Begin Combining the Flour and Eggs: As you whisk the eggs, begin gradually pulling in flour from the bottom and sides of the bowl. Don’t rush this step. At first, the eggs will start to look like a slurry. Once enough flour has been added, it will start forming a very soft dough. Don’t worry if you haven’t used all the flour.

Knead the Pasta Dough: Turn the dough and any excess flour out onto a clean counter. Begin gently folding the dough on itself, flattening, and folding again. It will be extremely soft at first, then gradually start to firm up. Once it’s firm enough to knead, begin kneading the dough. Incorporate more flour as needed to prevent the dough from sticking to you or the counter. Slice into the dough with a paring knife; if you see lots of air bubbles, keep kneading. The dough is kneaded when it forms a smooth elastic ball and has very few air bubbles when cut.

Rest the Pasta Dough: Clean and dry the mixing bowl. Place the ball of dough inside and cover with a dinner plate or plastic wrap. Rest for at least 30 minutes.
Note: At this point, the pasta dough can be refrigerated for up to 24 hours. Let it come back to room temperature before rolling.

Divide the Pasta Dough: Sprinkle a baking sheet generously with flour and scrape the ball of dough on top (it will stick to the bowl; use a spatula or bowl scraper if necessary). Divide the dough into four equal portions. Dust the portions with flour and cover with a clean dishtowel.

Begin Rolling Out the Pasta: Set your pasta machine to the thickest setting (usually marked “1”). Flatten one piece of dough into a thick disk between your hands and feed it through the pasta roller. Repeat once or twice. Fold this piece of dough into thirds, like folding a letter, and press it between your hands again. With the pasta machine still on the widest setting, feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers (see picture). Feed it through once or twice more until smooth. If desired, repeat this folding step. This helps to strengthen the gluten in the flour, giving it a chewier texture when cooked.

Thin the Pasta: Begin changing the settings on your roller to roll the pasta thinner and thinner. Roll the pasta two or three times at each setting, and don’t skip settings (the pasta tends to snag and warp if you do). If the pasta gets too long to be manageable, lay it on a cutting board and slice it in half. Roll the pasta as thin as you like to go. For linguine and fettuccine, use the 6 or 7 settings.

Cut the Pasta: Cut the long stretch of dough into noodle-length sheets, usually about 12-inches. If making filled pasta or lasagna, proceed with shaping. If cutting into noodles, switch from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter, and run the sheet of pasta through the cutter. Toss the noodles with a little flour to keep them from sticking and gather them into a loose basket. Set this basket on the floured baking sheet and cover with a towel while you finish rolling and cutting the rest of the dough.

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3 thoughts on “Fresh Pasta

  1. No apron hanging up allowed, I’m afraid. I’ve tried it and it just doesn’t last. As long as you keep one step ahead of those pesky little chefs, you’ll be fine. Maybe you should start practising Baked Alaska or something and beat them at their own game.

  2. This is one I personally will not be attempting! I was lost at salt. Did I miss the amount? Or did you? No matter, I love your blog! Thanks for all you do (and your guest bloggers, too). And thanks for the tip about Master Chef Junior. Sounds like great inspiration.

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